Print Bookmark

Notes


Matches 13,651 to 13,700 of 13,931

      «Prev «1 ... 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 ... 279» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
13651 was aboard the Aloe to NSW in 1857, page 12, age 18, agricultural labourer. Slater, Hugh (I26723)
 
13652 Was informant on his father's death cert. From Partick Glasgow. Wald, Alexander Robert (I31533)
 
13653 was with Hudson Bay Company.
1851 Stara Birsay age 83 Poor begging man, wife Ann 64, daughter Ann 42 Straw Plaiting. 
Stickler, Thomas (I2605)
 
13654 watch repairer. Mowat, Gavin (I48475)
 
13655 Watchmaker and Inspector of Poor.
1891 Dundas St Stromness age 23 lodger, Apprentice Watchmaker.
1901 Pierowall No 19 Westray age 35 Watchmaker, wife Betsy L 26, children; John 5, George 3, Maggie L 1.
1911 16 Pierowall (3 r/w) Westray age 43 Watch Maker, Repairer, Jewelery, wife Betsy 36 (Mar: 16y, 7, 7), children; George 13, Maggie E 11, Thomas 9, Mary 6, David 4, Adam G 1.
Ladykirk, Pierowall, Westray c4/56;
ERECTED BY BETSY DREVER IN LOVING MEMORY OF HER HUSBAND DANIEL LESLIE WATCHMAKER WHO FELL ASLEEP IN JESUS 3rd JULY 1912 AGED 44 YEARS ALSO THEIR SON JOHN LESLIE WHO DIED IN ABERDEEN ON MAR 23rd 1930 AGED 34 YEARS ALSO THE ABOVE BETSY DREVER WHO DIED JULY 9th 1948 AGED 73 YEARS 
Leslie, Daniel (I4918)
 
13656 Watermoor Hospital Flett, James (I35869)
 
13657 Wed 22nd Jan 1879 South Australian Register
FOULIS. - On the 8th January, at Ascot Vale, Melbourne, after a short illness, James Hamilton, beloved infant of Captain James C. and Annie Foulis, aged six months and three weeks. 
Foulis, James Hamilton (I30660)
 
13658 Wednesday 14 February 1912; The Adelaide Register; MR. MILLER. M.P. (Burra Burra).
Mr. William Miller, M.P., one of the earliest settlers in the Petersburg district, was born in the Orkney Islands in 1850. and arrived with his parents two years later. He remained with his father until the opening up of the northern areas, when he proceeded to the Hundred of Belalie. Twelve months later he removed to Golden Gully. That was before Petersburg came into existence. He was a member chariman of the Yongala District Council for some years, was a prominent supporter of the local agricultural society, and took the initial step in connection with the establishment of the local Agricultural Bureau. He has represented Burra Burra since the enlargement of the electorate in 1902. Mr. Miller ia one of the leading authorities in Parliament on rural questions, and his knowledge has been very valuable lately in connection with the extension of land settlement. For many years he has been prominent in connection with the Farmers' Union.

Saturday 18 January 1913, an interview by Special Reporter for the Adelaide Advertiser;
Mr. W. Miller, M.P., is one of the kindliest men I know. He is a "good subject" for an interview. I rang him up by telephone. "Can I have an interview ?"' I asked. "If you like; come along." Mr. Miller was at Parliament House, and when I arrived I found him with company. "I don't want to interrupt" I began. "That's all right; we are only killing time," he responded in his quiet way. We walked into the Assembly Chamber, and Mr. Miller subsided into his customary place. For the time being I occupied Mr. Robert Homburg's seat. I cannot say I received inspiration from the columned hall. I chiefly was impressed by the fact that it made one uncomfortable trying to write upon the table provided for members while retaining one's seat upon the couch like bench. "Tell me what you want and I will endeavor to answer," said Mr. Miller. "I was born at Stronsay, Orkney Islands, in 1850, and was brought by my father (the late Peter Miller, of South Rhine) to South Australia in 1852. The family immediately upon landing at Port Adelaide proceeded to Mount Crawford, where my father be- came overseer for the late David Randell, who selected, planted, and erected the buildings upon what is now known as Coryton Park. Mr. Randell called it Glen Para, and Mr. Rounsevell subsequently named it Coryton. Five years after my father joined him Mr. Randell selected, a block of country in South Rhine. My father then became manager of that, and during the ensuing three years planted the garden which has since come to be known as Rogers' vineyard. It may be worthy of note that between 1852 and 1857, 100 cows were, milked at Coryton Park and 100 more at a station down the run now known as Murray Dawson's property. Apart from dairying on Mr. Randell's farms, a large amount of wheat, barley, and oats was grown. In those days they used to cut either with sickle, or scythe, the threshing being done by machinery. It was in 1856, I think, that the first stripper came into the district, and was purchased by Mr.Randell from a man named Marshall, of Adelaide. It worked as well as the stripper of today, but was much heavier to draw, requiring a team of eight bullocks. In 1860 my father started for himself at a place about three miles from Springton."There was no township then?" "No. He carried on farming and dairying there until July,1906, when he died at the age of 85. He was a breeder of first-class draught horses. His youngest sons, E., and D. Miller, are still on the homestead. In the years 1865-6 which are historical on account of the drought which occurred throughout most of the State, South Rhine and Mount Pleasant had heavy crops, though the lower and far northern district suffered complete failures. That information is, important because it shows the value of the South Rhine country, and is a strong argument the residents have been using for the last fifty years in favour of constructing a railway to the district. But they have not got one yet. The next season in South Rhine was very wet, and though the crops were heavy they were rotten with red rust and returned about 2 or 3 bushells to the acre of wheat that did not go more than 55 Hd to the bushel.'' They were dark days? "Indeed, they were. After two or three years take all made its appearance."Was that the first you knew of take all? "Yes; and it made the burden of the farmers heavier still. Many went to the northern areas." And left South Rhine deserted? "Oh, no; not by any means. Many had had holdings of only 80 acres, and some only 40, and the land went into larger holdings. Even today on the Matthews' estate there are 22 tenants on less than 5,000 acres. Most of the original tenants' families are still on the estate. Most of those who journeyed northward were very successful, and some of the best farmers in the north are those who went from the neighborhood of Gumeracha and South Rhine in the early days." When did you ask the paternal blessing and strike out for yourself? "I think about '79. I put in twelve months at Belalie, near Jamestown, and then purchased a selection on the eastern side of the hundred of Morgan, ten miles north of the site of Petersburg. But there was no Petersburg or railway then. I have seen the railway come and the town grow. I carted my wheat l8 miles to Yongala, or else 32 miles to Jamestown. I had great trouble with rabbits, which first overran that country when I started. During the second year I was there the hundred of Coglin was surveyed. For a few years the farmers did fairly well, buk on account of drought in 1892 and subsequently they had to abandon their holdings. Since 1902, however, the farmers have been doing fairly well there. I sold my property four years ago." You have had experience of the severe droughts? "Yes, I went right through all of them. For several years I did not reap more than I sowed." How do farmers manage to live through such times? "Aye, it is a mystery. It would not have been so bad if they had had only one or two bad years, and then got a crop, but there were five or six consecutive absolute failures in the nineties. That is the worst drought that I remember." Worse than the '60 drought? "Yes, because it was longer. Most farmers had for years after 1802 to cart hay and cocky chaff to keep their stock alive. The Government granted seed wheat, but it was of no value to the farmers, because in each of the three years when it was granted the crops failed. It would have been better, if the farmers had not seen the seed wheat-but that was not the fault of the Government." Only a farmer knows the full significance of the term drought? "That is so. Some had a little money, and with assistance from the bank and the tradespeople industrious men were able to carry on until the seasons changed, but they suffered great privations." When the turn came they made their
fortunes? ''Not so many as you seem to think" Some lost heart and dropped out? "Quite a number went from my district to the other States. Most of the young people made for Broken Hill and worked to keep their parents on the farms during the bad times." That was like the Britisher. One hears of courage and heroism in many walks of life, but in spite of it all I suppose some of the old people had to give up? Do you know of any relinquishing their holdings just before the drought ended? "One man, the son of an English farmer, started up there worth a considerable sum of money, and when he began he had some very good crops. The drought ruined him after many years struggling against odds, and now he is an old age pensioner. There are many cases as pitiful. People dropped put just as the rain came, and others stepped in and got the reward which should have attended the efforts of the ruined men." It is very hard. Men cannot say when a drought will end. "Farmers keep on incurring expense, because to leave off sowing would perhaps mean that they would miss the rain when it came. It would have been better in the nineties for five, or six years had there been no crops in at all. But one can never say when the turn is coming."
Perhaps some means of accurately forecasting droughts will be discovered before long. "In the last ten years the introduction of a better system of farming by the use of phosphates and drills has assisted agriculture very much." Would the new methods pull us through another big drought? "Phosphates cannot make wheat grow without rain. But the drill is a wonderful help, because it puts the seed in at a regular depth. I have found the drill successful, even without phosphates. We cannot overlook the fact that in districts which had rain during the period of drought elsewhere there were light crops until the drill and manure came along. Phosphates and the drill really made the country. Look what they have encouraged us to do in the mallee. I believe from what I have seen, as a member of the Eyre Peninsula and Murray Lands Railways Commission, that there is a prosperous future before the land that has been and is to be opened up on Eyre Peninsula and east of the Murray. In a few years we ought to more than double the return of wheat in the State." What effect do you think a drought would have in the mallee country? "Doubtless diminished rainfall would entail lighter crops. But, you see, Loxton has passed through a dry period, and yet the crops were fairly good." Do you think more of the loamy soil in the mallee country, then, than of the heavier soil in the north? "The red sandy loam will do better with a lighter rainfall than the strong, heavy land will.They have produced excellent crops at Loxton on10 in. of rain." You have no doubt at all concerning the wisdom of building the railways that Parliament has recently authorised? "I think it was the best policy ever adopted to open up the country before the settlers go on it, and also to provide water for them." You have as much confidence in these new wheat provinces as in the tried land of the north? "I have.The crops may not be always | as heavy, but the country is thoroughly reliable. When you consider that on Eyre Peninsula there are 11,000,000 acres of land suitable for agriculture within the rain fall limit, and compare that with the 2,1/2 millions under cultivation in the whole of the State today, you will see that South Australia is only in its infancy in regard to agriculture. On the eastern side of the Murray there are another four million acres. Probably we shall have bad seasons, as we have had them in the past, but I don't think we will suffer to the same extent as we have done previously. Our geographical position makes us always liable to droughts." And what about this season? "I believe the State will average 10 bushels." That will be better than last year? "Yes, there are districts where the crops are light, but there is not a great deal of wheat growing in those districts. They are fair to very heavy in other places." You expect a better return than was predicted in the Government forecast? "Yes, prospects have improved even since then."
Wednesday 21 June 1922 The Register Adelaide; Death of Mr William Miller, Farmer & Legislator;
Mr. William Miller (Chairman of Directors of the South Australian Farmers Co-operative Union, Limited), who had been ailing for about six months, died on Tuesday morning at his sister's residence at Springton. 
Miller, William (I18942)
 
13659 Weekly Examiner (Launceston, Tas) Saturday 23 August 1873; GUN CLUB. - Pursuant to advertisement a meeting of persons interested in the formation of a Gun Club, was held in the St. Leonards Institute on Thursday evening. There was a very good attendance, and Mr P. I. De Bomford was voted to the chair. After discussion as to the objects of such an association and the best means of carrying them out, it was resolved to form a Club to be called the Northern Tasmanian Gun Club. Mr P. I. De Bomford was elected President, Mr Francis Dowling Secretary, Mr Kilner Dowling Treasurer. Dowling, Francis Thomas (I45562)
 
13660 Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954) Saturday 30 August 1884 WYKES.-On the 16th inst., at the Wesleyan Parsonage, Deloranie, Tasmania, the wife of the Rev. William Wykes of a son.
Edwin Watkin Wykes Birth Year: abt 1885 Age: 77 Death Place: Fran, Victoria Father's name: William Mother's name: Margaret Seater
Registration Year: 1962
Punch Melbourne Thursday 11th nov 1915. Artist's Announcement TO COURSING MEN AND OWNERS OF SPORTING DOGS.
Mr. E. W. WYKES is prepared to undertake the PORTRAITURE, in Oils or Crayons, of GREYHOUNDS or Other Sporting Dogs. Terms (strictly
moderate), together with testimonials and samples of work, on application. FRANKLIN ST., TRARALGON.
 
Wykes, Edwin Watkin (I43764)
 
13661 Weekly Times Melbourne Saturday 28th March 1914, Joseph Garson, late of Glenferrie road, Glenferrie, master mariner, left personal estate valued at £3698 to his wife and children, subject to a legacy, of £25 to the Home Mission Fund of the Presbyterian Church of Victoria and a legacy of £25 to the Foreign Mission Fund of the church.
Joseph Garson, Birth Year: abt 1832, Age: 82, Death Place: Hawthorn, Victoria, Father's name: Garson Wm, Mother's name: Margaret Sinclair
Registration Year: 1914, Registration Place: Victoria, Registration Number: 1913 
Garson, Joseph (I39134)
 
13662 Weekly Times Melbourne Saturday 7th August 1909; John Spence, an old age pensioner, aged about 68 years, was found dead in his hut at Jackass Gully, near Creswick. The body was in the fire-place, and was badly burnt. Spence had been seen alive on the previous afternoon. Spence, John (I5694)
 
13663 Weekly Times Melbourne Saturday 7th September 1929 With respect to the Mahogany ship reported to have been seen by the early settlers within a few miles from the town, half buried in the sand dunes, and supposed to have belonged to some early Spanish explorers, and connected with a naval officer's rapier found in the neighborhood, and numerous Spanish coins picked up by the blacks; although repeated searches have been made and rewards offered for its discovery by the Historical Society, it has never been unearthed. Some thirty years back, however, a divining rod was employed for the purpose and led to a lot of digging and sinking upon a certain spot at the bottom of which lay a lighter which had been buried by drifting
sands, and on examination bore the name of "John Brass, Warrnambool.'" Spanish ship built of mahogany has yet to be brought to light!
John Brass Birth Date: 1821 Birth Place: Orkney Islands, Scotland Death Date: 4 Mar 1895 Death Place: Victoria, Australia Cemetery: Warrnambool Cemetery Burial or Cremation Place: Warrnambool, Warrnambool City, Victoria, Australia; Spouse: Ann Brass Children: Johanna Smith
The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924) Thursday 7 March 1895 John Brass, a well-known resident of South Warrnambool, was found floating in the Merri River, he having apparently fallen from a temporary bridge into the water.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 6 March 1895 WARRNAMBOOL. TUESDAY EVENING. The body of John Brass, an old and well to do resident, was found in the Merri River today. An inquest was held by Mr. Mackay, J P. The evidence allowed that Brass when proceeding homewards last night had to cross a temporary footbridge over the Merri River, and marks on his head pointcd to the conclusion that he fell into the river. A verdict of accidentally drowned was returned.
John Brass Spouse Name: Ann Mcdonald Marriage Place: Victoria Registration Place: Victoria Registration Year: 1855 Registration Number: 2679
 
Brass, John (I32884)
 
13664 Well Road Miller, Janet (I46807)
 
13665 went south Louttit, Betsy (I8617)
 
13666 Went to Canada - in Canadian Army WW1. Miller, James (I1310)
 
13667 went to Canada. Craigie, James (I36652)
 
13668 Went to New Zealand in 1894. Stevenson, Stewart (I30092)
 
13669 went to NZ Taylor, Thomas S (I23837)
 
13670 went to NZ Taylor, Peter (I23838)
 
13671 went to NZ Slater, Thomas Linklater (I23867)
 
13672 went to NZ Slater, John George (I23870)
 
13673 went to NZ. Taylor, Issac (I23796)
 
13674 went to NZ. Taylor, Thomas (I23820)
 
13675 went to USA Peace, David (I677)
 
13676 went to USA Peace, Robert (I868)
 
13677 went to USA Peace, James (I869)
 
13678 went to USA Peace, Peter (I870)
 
13679 went to USA Peace, Barbara Ann (I871)
 
13680 went to USA in 1911 on s.s. California. Drummond, James William Stewart (I3214)
 
13681 Went to USA then returned to Orkney abt 1905 (notes from Pip Buchanan).
1911 Roadside age 41 Boot Repairer, Shopkeeper, wife Mary 37,(mar 3y,2,2.), children; Rachel Mary 2, Basil William 1.
1919 Roadside.
Grandfather of John Wallace.
old kirkyard headstone 364. 
Peace, John Miller (I678)
 
13682 Went to USA, and lived in Portland Oregon. (Info courtesy of Kathleen Dinsdale) Isbister, Malcolm Heddle (I17033)
 
13683 West Coast Sentinel ( Streaky Bay ) Sat. 14th Feb 1925; Obituary.-The death occurred at the residence of Mr and Mrs J. Mudge, Chandada on Thursday evening, of Mr William Thomas Stewart Hewison, a very old identity of the Streaky Bay district. The late Mr Hewison was 71 years of age and came to Australia from Scotland many years ago. We hope to publish a short biographical sketch in our next issue.
West Coast Sentinel (Streaky Bay, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 21 February 1925; THE LATE MR W. T. S. HEWISON. The late Mr W. T. S. Hewison, whose death was reported in these columns last week, was born in Scotland and came to South Australia in the sailing ship "Rupert" about forty-seven years ago. On arriving at Port Adelaide, he immediately proceeded to Streaky Bay where he was engaged by Mr J. M. Linklater, of Kirkala Station, to whom he was related. Some little time later he was appointed overseer at Kirkala, and when the property was sold to Messrs W. H. Simms and Colley, he was appointed manager, Mr Colley removing to Adelaide. When Kirkala was cut up for closer settlement purposes, Mr Hewison removed to Carina, where he managed a property for Mr Colley. He remained in this position some time, relinquishing it to accept the position of clerk of the Streaky Bay district council which had been in existence for a few years only at that time. Mr Hewison conducted the
affairs of the district council with marked ability for a number of years, but resigned the position to accept a offer as manager at Nullabor Station for Mr T. Browne. Later he tried his fortunes in Western Australia, returning after a few years to live with his daughter, Mrs John Mudge, of Chandada. But he only remained there for two or three years before going to Adelaide to reside with another daughter. Ill-health and old age began to tell on his vitality and just before Christmas, Mr Hewison again returned to Streaky Bay, finally going to Chandada where he spent his last days.
The deceased gentleman married about forty-four years ago, Alice Maud, daughter of the late Mr James Turner, of Semaphore, who predeceased him thirty years ago.
William Thomas S Hewison Death Place South Australia Reg Year 1916-1925 Reg Place: South Australia Page Number:118 Volume Number:477
Surname HEWISON Given Names WILLIAM THOMAS STEWART Cemetery Streaky Bay Section NW PORTION OF CEMETERY Plot/Grave/Niche 5 Last Residence CHANDADA Date of Interment 1925-02-13 Minister Officiating REV LANE ANGLICAN Grant Number 197 
Hewison, William Thomas Stewart (I49039)
 
13684 West Coast Sentinel (Streaky Bay, SA Friday 28th March 1913 CARAWA. (From our own Correspondent.) March 18.
General regret was expressed here last week when it became known that Mrs. J. H. Drever had passed away suddenly at the home of her brother(Mr. Edgar Dunn), at about 7 o'clock on Tuesday morning, 11th inst. On Sunday evening Mrs. Drever had been feeling a little unwell, but did not think there was anything serious the matter. Early on Monday morning,however, Mr. Dunn discovered his sister in an unconscious state. Everything possible was done, but when Dr. Steven arrived he could give no hope whatever. Great pain must have existed during Monday, but just before the end on Tuesday morning signs of pain gave way to a greater peacefulness. The last moment of consciousness was on Sunday evening, and the end came without consciousness having been regained. Great sympathy is felt for Mr. Drever,who was at Murat when Mrs. Drever was taken ill, and for the brothers and sisters living here, as well as relatives farther away. The funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon,about eighty people joining in the cortege to the graveside, where theservice was read by Eev. W. S. Dawe.On Sunday afternoon, in the hall, an In Memoriam service was held, at which about thirty people were present. Suitable music was provided by Mr. Lewis, while Mr. Dawe spoke on the necessity of bearing up under trial, so that we may the more readily fit ourselves to follow the Will of God, which is, that we may, in His good time rejoin our loved ones,the remarks being based on Ezekielxxiv., 18, " At even my wife died, and I did in the morning as I was commanded."

DREVER Ivy; In Memoriam Notice West Coast Sentinel 10th March 1917
DREVER - In loving memory of my dear wife, Ivy, who passed away on March 11th, 1913
Often my thoughts do wander,
To the grave so far away,
Where I laid my darling wife
Just four years ago today.
- Inserted by her loving husband, James Henry Drever.
In Memorium Notice West Coast Sentinel 16th March 1918; DREVER - In loving memory of my dear wife (Ivy), who passed away at Carawa, March 11th, 1913.
"God moves in a mysterious way his wonders to perform." Inserted by her loving husband, James Drever A.I.F., France 
Dunn, Ivy Annie (I32247)
 
13685 West Coast Sentinel Saturday 14th July 1917; CHEYNE.-On July 8th, at Rockhampton,, Queensland, to Mr and Mis Peter J. A.Cheyne-a daughter. Information by telegraph.
Early in their married life, they must have then lived for a few years back on the west coast of the Eyre Peninsula S.A. because Peter put an advertisement in the Streaky Bay Newspaper: West Coast Sentinel Streaky Bay, SA Saturday 19th April 1924 PETER A. CHEYNE desires to advise the residents of Elliston and district that he has opened a motor garage in Elliston and is prepared to undertake all classes of repair work to CARS, MOTOR CYCLES, ENGINES, ETC., TERMS CASH. 1023
Peter Cheyne, as a teenager, had been a participant in children's competitions in the newspaper. His exact date of birth can be deduced from the following : Evening Journal Adelaide, SA Saturday 10 December 1898 MANY HAPPY RETURNS OF THE DAY NOTICE.Only those "Sunbeams" who write to Uncle Hany within a month of their birthday will have it remembered. Tomorrow, December 11th, to Peter A. J. Cheyne, Elliston (15).....
Peter and Mary Ann were still alive in the 1950s ( and presumably still in Queensland ) because they stopped in to visit their old town,Cracow.
Morning Bulletin Rockhampton, Qld Monday 21st January 1952 Old-timers will remember Mr and Mrs Cheyne, who passed through Cracow on their way back to Emu Park.
The Cheynes had two daughters. This was the wedding of the first in 1938 : Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. Friday 19th August 1938
A CRACOW WEDDING; Bartholomaeus-Cheyne, St Augustine's Church of England, Cracow, was the scene of a very pretty wedding when Miss Netta Aurelle Cheyne, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs Peter Cheyne, was married to Mr Colin F. Bartholomaeus, only son of Mr and Mrs G. F. Bartholomaeus, of Cracow, on the evening of August 11. The church was decorated by the bride's friends,and was a bower of flowers. Brother C. Lavender officiated. She was attended by her sister,Robey, who was frocked in old gold moire taffeta, trimmed with sequined belt and crystal buttons.
Four years later, just before the New Year of 1942, the younger daughter, Roby Cheyne also married, but was then tragically killed in a car accident returning from the honeymoon. West Coast Sentinel Streaky Bay Friday 13th Feb. 1942 FUNERAL OF MRS. HEINIGER
A fortnight ago a short account of the death of Mrs. N. Heiniger was published in these columns. Mrs. Heiniger before her marriage was Miss Roby Cheyne, the younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Cheyne, of Cracow, Queensland, and at one time of Ceduna.
Further details of the tragedy are now available. Mr. and Mrs Heiniger were married on December 30, and were returning from a honeymoon spent in Brisbane and Gympie. They had just left Gayandah on the last part of the journey to Cracow. In attempting to pass a utility truck, the baby tourer in which they were travelling, driven by the owner, Mr. F. Sleep, collided with the utility and overturned, pinning the occupants underneath. The front part of the utility came to rest on the overturned car and had to be removed with levers before the occupants of the car could be released. It is believed that Mrs. Heiniger was killed instantly. The other occupants of the car, Mr.Heiniger and Messrs. F. and R. Sleep, escaped without injury, except that Mr.Heiniger was detained in hospital one night suffering from shock. Mrs. Heiniger's body was brought to Cracow, where it remained in St. Augustine's Church of England until interred in Cracow Cemetery on January 19. At the service held in the church before the funeral, the hymn "Abide With Me" was sung. There was a very large attendance at the funeral. The casket was covered with beautiful floral tributes. Ceduna folk remember Roby for her lovable and friendly nature; their sympathy goes out to the bereaved husband, parents, and sister.

Mary Robertha Heiniger
Death Date: 17 Jan 1942
Death Place: Queensland
Father's name: Peter Arthur James Cheyne
Mother's name: Mary Jane Drever
Registration Year: 1942
Registration Place: Queensland
Registration Number: 000096
Page Number: 1017 
Cheyne, Peter Arthur James (I32246)
 
13686 West Coast Sentinel Streaky Bay 4th Nov 1927, DEATH. AGARS.-On the 16th October, at her residence, Flinders House, Elliston, Margaret. widow of the late George Agars, and eldest daughter of the late John and Mary Dinnison, "Strathoar," Mt. Wedge Aged 73 years. At rest. Dennison, Margaret (I37610)
 
13687 West Coast Sentinel Streaky Bay, SA Friday 8th Nov. 1929; MR. JAMES DREVER.
When Mr. James Corrical Drever passed away at the Streaky Bay public hospital on Sunday, death claimed a colonist of the State of 51 years. The late Mr.Drever was 79 years of age, and his death was not unexpected. The old gentleman was very widely known on the West Coast and his happy disposition made him quite a favorite. The late Mr. Drever was born at Pharay Island, in the north of Scotland, in 1850. As a boy, he tried his luck in the Argentine, going there in the steamer Eddamanna in the year 1864. He worked on a sheep station there for Messrs. Gibson Brothers for three years.He then returned to his home country.In 1878 the subject of this review married Mary Ann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.Peter Muir, of Dumfrieshire, in the parish of North Leith, Edinburgh. The same year the young couple set out for Australia in the sailing ship, Queen of Nation, and settled at Mintaro, but a little later proceeded to Hoyleton, where the family was born and reared. In 1890 the family came to the West Coast and settled at Calca,where Mrs. Drever died at the age of 36 years. She was either the first or second person buried in the newer portion of the Streaky Bay cemetery.
After Mrs. Drever's death, Mr. Drever proceeded to Fowler's Bay, where he conducted farming operations for some years,relinquishing this when his last single daughter married. Since then he had lived in retirement in and around Streaky Bay. The funeral was conducted on Monday afternoon at the Streaky Bay cemetery,and respect for the old gentleman was shown by the large number who followed the remains to the graveside, many travelling long distances. The surviving members of the family are Mr. T. D. Drever (Petina), Mrs. E. P.Dunn (Carawa), Mrs. P. A. Cheyne(Ceduna), Mr. Jas. H. Drever (WestCroydon), and Mr. J. C. Drever (Streaky Bay). One son and two daughters are dead. There are also seventeen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
James C Drever Birth Date: 19 Apr 1848 Birth Place: Faray, Orkney Islands, Scotland Death Date: 3 Nov 1929 Death Place: Streaky Bay, District Council of Streaky Bay, South Australia, Australia Cemetery: Streaky Bay Burial or Cremation Place: Streaky Bay, District Council of Streaky Bay, South Australia, Australia Spouse: Mary Ann Drever Children: John Charles Drever Catherine Charlotte Drever 
Drever, James Corrigal (I32450)
 
13688 West Coast Sentinel Wednesday 9th June 1946; OBITUARY. The sudden passing of Edgar Phillip Dunn has removed another of the old Carawa pioneers. Born at Balaklava in 1881, he came with his parents to the West Coast in 1891, the family settling at Bookabie. On reaching his majority
he took up land at Carawa in 1902, living there until his death. In 1904 he married Bella, daughter of the late James Drever, of Bookabie. His jovial disposetion, his zest of life, and his openhearted hospitality gained for him a great number of friends, both up and down theCoast. He was a familiar figure at sale rings and social functions. He was an ardent supporter of the Methodist Church from the time of the holding of the first service in 1906. He was particularly helpful to the young home missionaries, who came to work the large circuit, and for a number of years his
home was there. Besides his widow, Mr. | Dunn leaves a family of seven sons and daughters-Alma (Mrs. L. Dodd, of Nunjikompita); Jessie (Mrs. J. Drew), Petina: Eric?, Carawa.; Ronald, Bookabie; Lila (Mrs. R. W. Lovelock), Smoky Bay; Colin, Carawa; and Isabel (Mrs. Bergman), Ceduna. Two of his sons, Eric and Colin, served, in the forces. 
Dunn, Edgar Philip (I32245)
 
13689 West Side Kirkyard, Westray row 1 plot 5;
ERECTED BY ROBERT DREVER IN LOVING MEMORY OF HIS WIFE ELIZABETH GROAT WHO DIED 30th AUG 1910 AGED 73 YEARS ALSO THE ABOVE ROBERT DREVER WHO DIED 4th MAY 1919 AGED 82 YEARS. 
Drever, Robert (I6119)
 
13690 West Side Kirkyard, Westray row 1, plot 3;
ERECTED BY ROBERT GROAT IN LOVING MEMORY OF HIS WIFE MARY DREVER DIED 6th AUG 1899 AGED 56 YEARS. ALSO THE ABOVE ROBERT GROAT DIED 2nd MARCH 1915 AGED 79 YEARS BUT I KNOW IN WHOM I HAVE BELIEVED 
Groat, Robert (I6114)
 
13691 West Side Kirkyard, Westray row 2, plot 20;
ERECTED IN MEMORY OF GEORGE SEATTER WHO DIED 13th DEC 1930 AGED 76 YEARS ALSO HIS WIFE JANE DREVER WHO DIED 14th JAN 1934 AGED 65 YEARS ALSO THEIR SON JOHN THOMAS WHO DIED 20th AUG. 1991 AGED 83 YEARS UNTIL THE DAY BREAKS AND THE SHADOWS FLEE AWAY. 
Seater, George (I6397)
 
13692 West Side Kirkyard, Westray row 4, plot 40;
ERECTED BY JANET DREVER IN MEMORY OF HER BELOVED HUSBAND THOMAS PATERSON WHO DIED 13th SEPT 1902 AGED 70 YEARS ALSO THE ABOVE JANET DREVER HIS BELOVED WIFE WHO DIED 3rd AUG 1917 AGED 76 YEARS 
Paterson, Thomas (I14884)
 
13693 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, 26/266;
ERECTED BY ROBERT & BETSY RENDALL IN MEMORY OF THEIR SON ROBERT BORN 9th JULY 1872 DIED 20th MARCH 1893 ALSO THE ABOVE BETSY SKEA DIED 17DEC 1912 AGED 75 YEARS 
Rendall, Robert (I23340)
 
13694 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 12, plot 125;
HERE RESTS THE REMAINS OF CATHERINE DREVER WIFE OF DAVID RENDALL WHO DIED MAY 2nd 1862 AGED 35/3? YEARS. 
Drever, Catherine (I7241)
 
13695 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 12. plot 128;
IN MEMORY OF MARGARET ALLAN WHO DIED MARCH 22nd 1861 AGED 4. YEARS. 
Allan, Margaret Logie (I9699)
 
13696 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 13, plot 130;
ERECTED BY MARGARET DREVER IN LOVING MEMORY OF HER HUSBAND JOHN RENDALL WHO WAS ACCIDENTALLY KILLED AT FRIBO ON JUNE 30th 1925 AGED 41 YEARS ALSO THEIR DAUGHTER JANET WHO DIED 23rd AUG 1911 AT HAMILTON LANARKSHIRE AGED 7 MONTHS AND THE ABOVE MARGARET DREVER WHO DIED 4th JULY 1970 AGED 91 YEARS ALSO THEIR DAUGHTER ANNIE WHO DIED 26th APRIL 1978 AGED 68 YEARS SUDDENLY THE VOICE SAITH COME ENTRE THINE ETERNAL HOME ASKING NOT IF WE COULD SPARE OUR DEAR ONES THEIR SUMMONDS THERE 
Rendall, John (I13252)
 
13697 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 21, plot 236;
ERECTED BY WM & ELIZABETH DREVER IN MEMORY OF THEIR DAUGHTER ISABELLA BORN 26th AUG 1884 AND DIED 18th AUG 1887 ALSO THEIR SON PETER DIED 14th MAY 1900 AGED 17 YEARS ALSO THEIR MOTHER ELIZABETH MILLER WHO DIED 12th SEPT 1906 AGED 54 YEARS 
Miller, Elizabeth (I8627)
 
13698 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 28, plot 283;
ERECTED BY JAMES POTTINGER IN MEMORY OF HIS MOTHER IN LAW MARY DUNNET DIED 8th JANY 1859 AGED 57 YEARS AND HIS WIFE MARY DREVER DIED 1st JANY 1869 AGED 39 YEARS AND HIS DAUGHTER TOMIMA WHO DIED 19th JULY 1879 AGED 16 YEARS. 
Drever, Mary (I16536)
 
13699 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 34, plot 328;
ERECTED IN MEMORY OF THOMAS DREVER WHO DIED 3rd SEPTR 1889 AGED 85 YEARS ALSO HIS WIFE JANE BAIN WHO DIED 17th FEB 1901 AGED 88 YEARS.
Orkney and Shetland American. Nov. 1889 Drever - At Roadside, Rapness, Westray, 1889, Sept. 3, Thomas Drever, shoemaker, aged 85 years.
 
Drever, Thomas (I10727)
 
13700 West Side Kirkyard, Westray, row 37, plot 353;
ERECTED BY ANN ALLAN IN MEMORY OF HER BELOVED HUSBAND JAMES MASON WHO DIED 2nd MAY 1903 AGED 63 YEARS ALSO THEIR CHILD THOMAS WHO DIED 1878 AGED 6 MONTHS ALSO THE ABOVE ANN ALLAN DIED 18th JUNE 1907 AGED 60 YEARS A LIGHT IS FROM OUR HOUSEHOLD GONE THE VOICE WE LOVED IS STILLED A PLACE IS VACANT IN OUR HOME THIS WORLD CAN NEVER FILL 
Mason, James (I9662)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 ... 279» Next»


This site powered by The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding ©, written by Darrin Lythgoe 2001-2019.